Johnson Vet Services https://johnsonvet.com Small Animal Veterinarian - Marietta, Georgia Tue, 17 Sep 2019 14:21:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://johnsonvet.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/cropped-jvs_logo_tiny_square-1-32x32.png Johnson Vet Services https://johnsonvet.com 32 32 Taking Your Dog To The Lake https://johnsonvet.com/taking-your-dog-to-the-lake/ Tue, 17 Sep 2019 01:30:19 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=2011 Taking Your Dog To The Lake – Common Considerations When you take your dog to the lake you can be exposing them to a TON of fun and healthy exercise but there are some other things to note. Cyanobacteria Okay now THIS is a rarity in the extreme. I heard about this in Vet School […]

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Taking Your Dog To The Lake – Common Considerations

When you take your dog to the lake you can be exposing them to a TON of fun and healthy exercise but there are some other things to note.

Cyanobacteria

Okay now THIS is a rarity in the extreme. I heard about this in Vet School in 1991 where it had killed some deer next to a farm pond. The next time I heard about it was just this year (2019) and it came and went as a “thing” and I kind of think it was blown out of proportion as on rare occasion, the media does. One case was reported but unconfirmed, and the lake in question tested negative. But, it happens. It wouldn’t hurt to stay out of water that seems ‘stagnant’ or which contains a dark algae floating at or near the water’s surface. The algae doesn’t tend to be in full sun and it prefers clear water without much depth. (Article)

Dog’s death points to possible toxic algae bloom in Allatoona Lake

Oils in the water

This issue is pretty common and causes irritation to the coat until the pet is bathed thoroughly. When a two stroke boat motor burns the ‘gas oil’ mix, it puts a tremendous amount of pollution into, and ONTO the water. The stuff kills ocean reefs and that’s why two stroke engines aren’t allowed within miles of precious barrier reefs all over the carribean. In any event, this gas oil combustion byproduct floats on the water and creates a brown film on the piers, and pontoons on the lake. And when your kids or dog spend the day in and out of the water, they get this irritating mix on their skins and coats. Well, the kids take a bath, and your dog should too. Otherwise it could be an itchy deal for the dog.

Ear Infections

For some dogs, water left in the ear can set up infections about 2 weeks later. They start in the horizontal canal and eventually you can see the redness and itching creeping up the vertical canal about a week or two later. Dogs with ear flaps that stick UP seldom have a problem with water in the ears. But dogs with ‘dependent’ or droopy ears or who have a lot of hair growing IN the ear, can have ear infections from that. You can attempt to dry the ears after the weekend at the lake, or even apply something with a soothing ‘oil’ in it, to repel water. Zymox is a favorite of mine, if you even do anything at all. A decent ear cleaner also can work because they remove various contaminants (as listed above) that may be residing in the ear. If your dog is prone to ear infections and you already have a bottle of Gentizol, GenOne, Entederm, Mometasone, Panolog or similar oily medication for yeast and bacteria, that could work preventatively as a single dose after swimming. But the key is “oily”

Overexertion

Overexertion, or “tying up” can happen if a dog swims or runs around a LOT more than usual. The muscles get deprived of oxygen and the muscle fibers get overtaxed and the combination causes some of the muscle fibers to die. This causes muscle pain, stiffness and a serious reluctance to move around. Hydration is key the next day and the vet may even decide to run some fluids. Bloodwork can detect a high CPK level and the urine may be dark. This is seldom fatal. So just watch it, especially if your dog isn’t really THAT active and you suspect that THIS weekend, he will be.

Drowning

Drowning’s uncommon as well. In fact, I’ve only ever heard of one of my patients legit drowning and that poor dog had a seizure and fell into the pool before the owner could rescue her. That was sad. At the lake, I almost lost my own dog because he wasn’t wearing a life preserver. He was older, and a weak swimmer and we had turned the boat around after he jumped in, and we made it just in time as he was sinking low in the water. Another dog hit his head and almost drowned. My point is (hence the referenced article) to put a life preserver on your dog at the lake. ]

Or YOU Drowning

You know, like your dog gets on you in a panic and drowns you.

Know Your Snakes

A solid nine out of ten snakes you meet at the lake (United States) are Northern Water Snakes. Not copperheads or water moccasins but you never really know. Unless you know. Learn the snakes. By-and-large the poisonous snakes have triangular heads far wider than their necks. And they have slit-pupils (like a cat) as if you’re really going to stoop down and check THAT out, huh? ha ha ha!!

This is a Water Moccasin. Also called a Cotton Mouth.
This is a copperhead and they don’t like water, and they have a big wide triangular head. Their pupils are slits.
Northern Banded Water Snake note the narrow head and by the way Copperheads hate swimming.

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CBD – How It Feels – What It Actually Does https://johnsonvet.com/cbd-how-it-feels-what-it-actually-does/ Thu, 05 Sep 2019 13:20:35 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1981 CBD – How It Feels – What It Actually Does Want me to nut shell it? Summarize to ONE word? “Whatevs” You’re adding this word to the lexicon of any animal or person that gets CBD (cannabidiol) in sufficient quantities. Sometimes that’s PERFECT –  other times not-so-much. It doesn’t affect a dog’s engagement in ‘happy’ […]

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CBD – How It Feels – What It Actually Does

Want me to nut shell it? Summarize to ONE word?

“Whatevs”

CBD Can give some people a “whatever” disposition. It’s okay in dogs.

You’re adding this word to the lexicon of any animal or person that gets CBD (cannabidiol) in sufficient quantities.

Sometimes that’s PERFECT –  other times not-so-much.

It doesn’t affect a dog’s engagement in ‘happy’ stuff. Who says “Whatever” to fun?

But stuff that used to cause anxiety – –  “Whatever

CBD stands for “Can’t Be Disturbed” it basically inserts the term “whatever” after most of the things that would otherwise frighten or annoy a dog or cat.

“I’m not doing this with you right now“ 
Irritability is short-lived and you’re quick to give up on things that make you mad.

“Whatever.” This term moves into the lexicon of the person or animal taking CBD with consistency and at a sufficient dose. For better or worse, a dog might get a lot less angry about other dogs when it is being walked. A cat, might take less notice of another cat or its behavior in the household.

Paradoxically, that attitude is not taken towards things that a person or animal might enjoy. In fact, their ability to be in the moment when doing something they enjoy seems intensified.

“CBD helped me cope with a great loss.”
It’s very hard to hold something in your mind. You become “forgetful“ of the things that annoy you. It’s not that you don’t think about them, it’s just that you don’t dwell on them. In fact, unless it’s something you really like, it’s hard to dwell on anything. This can be a drawback for people who make a living as large problem-solvers.

CBD can reduce the sense of urgency that you feel from moment to moment. This would *NOT* be a good compound for world leaders to be taking as they try to work out important matters that require passion, effort, surrounding potentially hostile issues. No problems would be solved, they would simply shrug their shoulders and say “Whatever.”

CBD might also be a poor choice for someone with a tendency to procrastinate. Or if you are already overwhelmed by situations in your life, it will be difficult to fixate on those issues and then have the passion to situate them.

CBD oil does not make you calm. It does not have a calming affect. You don’t take CBD and then become calm. When mixtures of THC and CBD are available, we will start to see some of the greater benefits of cannabinoid therapy.

“I Sleep Better”
CBD is much less likely to make you sleepy, then it is to keep you from holding onto things that would otherwise keep you from falling asleep. If that makes any sense.

CBD is not a “you take it – you feel it” compound like THC containing oil’s are.

For people, and speaking for myself, and perhaps based on the dosage that I was taking, I think there may be better ways to control inflammatory processes like arthritis. The anti-inflammatory process is gradual and cumulative. Stay on it, and the CBD will gradually decrease the arthritis pain until it’s very minimal. 30 days or so for me.

There is no doubt in my mind that CBD oil has anti-inflammatory properties as I saw consequential improvements in a stress related skin and bowel disorder that has been with me for quite a few years.  TMI right?

Dogs and cats don’t have first-world “problems” to fix so in my opinion CBD is perfect for them.

I, on the other hand, will be discontinuing my CBD, because I do have real problems, and I need to have the passion to fixate on them long enough to fix them. I will miss the anti-anxiety effects and improved “being in the moment” benefits.

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Filaroides Hirthi Lung Worms in Dogs https://johnsonvet.com/filaroides-hirthi-lung-worms-in-dogs/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 18:58:25 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1972 Filaroides Hirthi Lung Worms in Dogs Questions were whether it was highly infectious –  (and it is, the larva are infectious when passed in the animals’ poops and discharges) AND they can harbor the parasite and it can get worse on its own, with passage from lung to bowel and back again making it worse […]

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Filaroides Hirthi Lung Worms in Dogs

Questions were whether it was highly infectious –  (and it is, the larva are infectious when passed in the animals’ poops and discharges) AND they can harbor the parasite and it can get worse on its own, with passage from lung to bowel and back again making it worse and worse WITHOUT any environmental exposure to more infectious poop.

Also, does Heartgard Heartworm Preventative actually prevent the progression of the infection in dogs? I don’t have nor have I found a clear answer on that.

filaroides_hirthi_in_beagle_dogs

filaroides_osleri_indogs_exhaustive_article

 

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Broken Teeth in Dogs – Root Canal? https://johnsonvet.com/broken-teeth-in-dogs-root-canal/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 16:51:54 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1956 My dog broke a tooth “My dog broke a tooth, what should I do? I have heard that a root canal is extremely expensive!“ Answer: That’s actually true. There are veterinary specialists who perform root canals to save teeth that have been damaged that way. If a little bit of the tip of the tooth […]

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My dog broke a tooth

“My dog broke a tooth, what should I do? I have heard that a root canal is extremely expensive!“

Answer:

That’s actually true. There are veterinary specialists who perform root canals to save teeth that have been damaged that way. If a little bit of the tip of the tooth is broken off, they can open the pulp cavity, clean out the blood and nerve and pulp inside the tooth, which must be done extremely thoroughly, they can replace the content of the tooth with an inert substance and then they can close the tooth with a crown.

You seriously don’t want a regular vet performing this procedure. It would be the same as doing nothing with the tooth except a big bill. I saw enough of it in veterinary school and watching the specialist work, for me to know that you could create more problems than it is worth to try it with a regular vet who “probably can do that.“ You should be aware that the veterinarian can do the pulpotomy and seal the tooth and it will look successful. Besides turning grey or brown and translucent which it probably would have done anyway. Done correctly, the tooth is indistinguishable from the tooth on the other side.

By far the best way to approach a broken tooth (if you’re not going to see a specialist) is to leave it alone with one or two notable exceptions:

If it tooth is broken into more than one part and fractures in the tooth go up into the gumline, (Slab fracture) I think you owe it to the pet to get that removed.

The smaller part of a broken tooth like that, the part that goes up into the gumline is called a slab. Most veterinarians recommend removing the slab and leaving the main part of the tooth, if it has the majority of its root system. At that point if a person wanted to have a root canal done and close the tooth, that is certainly their prerogative.

Should I Show A Broken Tooth to My Vet?

Yes. I’m going to check on the:

  • dog’s prevailing condition,
  • assess pain and degree of pain and
  • whether the tooth has been broken into the gumline,
  • whether the tooth is loose in the jaw (dislodged),
  • whether the tooth deviates into the gums or lip now,
  • what other damage has occurred in the accident, and
  • whether the ‘stump’ of the tooth it sharp or problematic to the dog’s mouth. 

If my dog had a broken tooth, unless it was broken into the gumline, I would probably leave it alone or extract it.

Doesn’t it hurt if you leave the tooth in when it’s broken?

Yes and no.

For whatever reason, when a person breaks a tooth, they say it hurts for a while

I have no idea how they know this, but when an animal breaks a tooth, the pulp cavity with the nerve dies very quickly and without that nerve, the tooth becomes numb. My suspicion is that mother nature realized she could not have carnivores walking around holding their jaw for a broken tooth instead of eating, they gave them a very expedient nervous system with regards to broken teeth. In other words, “they get over it real fast.“

Any veterinarian worth their salt will tell you that there is a risk of infection gaining access to the tooth or even the face through a broken tooth and exposed pulp cavity, which is true. However, the odds of that are extremely low. First, the dog has its own immune system and can fight infections. Second, the root seldom stays open, quickly accumulating material and/or tartar as the dentin surfaces exposed in the fracture are highly receptive to tartar formation.

For whatever reason, in practice, I seldom see broken teeth meaning anything to the dog.

Interestingly, five times more often I see unbroken maxillary premolar getting an abscess at the base in dogs over 10 years old, that kind of tooth root abscess for whatever reason is quite common and manifests early and tenderly. Leading me to believe that if there were a problem with a broken tooth, you would know it just as fast and just the same way.
So the question comes up, “when would you have a root canal performed?“
Well, that would go to your pocketbook and what you needed the dog to do. Does it need the teeth to do a ‘job’?

I saw a Doberman Pinscher in the newspaper that had both of its fangs root canal, the jewelry store owner said that he needed his teeth to perform his job protecting the store. Of course I knew, that it was a publicity stunt for the jewelry store.
To be honest, if a dog does use its teeth for any aspect of its existence, and you can afford it, I think a root canal would be very nice.

So, who does root canals? There are veterinary specialists that do that and in the Roswell Georgia area there is Dr. Mees.

Atlanta Veterinary Dental Services
Mansell Oaks Plaza Shopping Center
Address: 900 Mansell Rd #19, Roswell, GA 30076
Phone: (770) 552-8777
httpss://atlantaveterinarydentistry.com/

Angela Mees, DVM
Dr. Mees is a native Atlantan. She graduated from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine in 1998. After six years in general practice, she devoted her career to veterinary dentistry.

She lives with her husband Brian and daughter Kaitlyn. Their family includes a greyhound, Goldie, a Labrador named Boomer, two cats, Tater and Dave, and 3 red ear slider turtles named, Dribble, Dribble Jr, and Dribble the Third.

“I would highly recommend this place if you’re in need of an emergency vet.”
“She and her staff are personable and knowledgeable.”
“Dr. Mees and her staff are amazing! They are all very helpful and Jessica is very thorough about explaining everything. Love these ladies and all they did for my kitty Merlin!”

She is very good, she is booked out a couple of months. A root canal I have heard, costs about $1500-$2000.

“Why won’t you do root canals, Erik?“
Because I figured it out while I was in vet school [and fresh out of school] that if you do a root canal and you are not perfect at it, you will actually triple the odds of infection inside the tooth by messing with it, over just leaving it open. I don’t want to be “that guy“ he charges somebody $1500 for a root canal only to have to go in later and cope with an infection in the jaw line, and then have to explain that I’m not a specialist and didn’t do it perfectly the way they do. My point: if you’re going to do it, have it done right and don’t pay a hack like me (and most other general practitioners) who shouldn’t be doing route canals.

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Foot lesions in dogs https://johnsonvet.com/foot-lesions-in-dogs/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 14:42:33 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1951 Foot Lesions in Dogs: Postoperatively You’re getting this document because your dog has some sort of lesion on its foot. That could be a tumor, laceration or any kind of surgery. Foot lesions in dogs have a certain set of predictable complications. It’s the nature of “walking around on your surgery”. Which is pretty much […]

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Foot Lesions in Dogs: Postoperatively

You’re getting this document because your dog has some sort of lesion on its foot. That could be a tumor, laceration or any kind of surgery.

Foot lesions in dogs have a certain set of predictable complications. It’s the nature of “walking around on your surgery”. Which is pretty much unavoidable. But can be strictly limited. And here’s why:
There are certain things, that just happen, every single time there are stitches in a dogs foot.
It doesn’t matter who your veterinarian is, or what you do, it’s just the way it goes:

Number one: Some stitches fall out.

Face it, the dog is basically walking on it suture line and that kind of stretching and tearing it’s going to put a lot of pressure on the stitches and sooner or later one or two of the stitches will pop. When that happens, a little bit of scar tissue fills in the gap which represents decent healing, but it does extend it past the normal seven or eight days it normally would take to heal.
Consider that every step the dog takes is pulling on the stitches, so the fewer steps it can take the longer the stitches will hold. But, some will pop. It is unavoidable.

Number two: Inflammation and discharge always occur.

Again, the dog is walking on a surgery site and every step pushes and pulls on the line and keeps healing from occurring as quickly as other places. Discharges accumulate and at first, that requires frequent bandage changes to keep those secretions from setting up infections.

Number three: Bandages are pretty important.

At first, postoperatively, you will probably be coming to the office every day or every other day for bandage changes. That is dependent upon the estimated amount of discharges in the bandage that need to be removed. It is imperative that you keep the bandages changed according to plan, I appreciate that it is labor and time intensive, but that is the nature of lesions on the foot.

Consider that every step the dog takes is pulling on the stitches, so the fewer steps it can take the longer the stitches will hold.

Number four: Abnormal tissues heal abnormally.

One of my reviews on Google hold that I did a poor surgery on the dogs foot, because the surgery did not heal normally. I would say that is a failure on my part to emphasize and explain to the client when you remove cancer from tissues and you expect cancerous tissues to heal back normally, that is often a fail. Of course when you go in you don’t know that you’re necessarily removing the cancer until later. So, when you are dealing with abnormal tissues, healing will often occur abnormally, whether that is delayed, weird looking, or painfully slow. Conversely, a cut made by some glass in normal tissue heals a lot faster than a cut made surgically in cancerous tissue. That’s all I’m trying to get across.

Number five: Consider that every step the dog takes is pulling on the stitches, so the fewer steps it can take the longer the stitches will hold.

The summary of this article occurs in five points

  1. Stitches always pop.
  2. Discharges always occur.
  3. Bandages require changes [sometimes frequently].
  4. Abnormal tissues heal back together abnormally.
  5. Every step the dog takes compromises the foot lesion, the more steps it takes, the longer the bandage and the stitches will last.

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insulinshots https://johnsonvet.com/insulinshots/ Mon, 02 Sep 2019 21:49:54 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1949 How to Give a Dog or Cat an Insulin Shot A simple download, or read online, a document about how to give an insulin shot to a dog. Or cat. 

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How to Give a Dog or Cat an Insulin Shot

A simple download, or read online, a document about how to give an insulin shot to a dog. Or cat. 

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The Best Diet Food Of All https://johnsonvet.com/the-best-diet-food-of-all/ Mon, 02 Sep 2019 21:38:32 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1946 Maybe you read my comparison of various grocery store and buyer’s club foods and recognized that I favor Costco’s Kirkland diet as “the best” of those. But what can you buy on Amazon that’s as good, or better? There’s a chicken and salmon based diet that is low fat and wholesome. And it comes at […]

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Maybe you read my comparison of various grocery store and buyer’s club foods and recognized that I favor Costco’s Kirkland diet as “the best” of those.

But what can you buy on Amazon that’s as good, or better?

There’s a chicken and salmon based diet that is low fat and wholesome. And it comes at a ‘decent’ price. What follows is a ling to Natural Balance dry dog food which is highly regarded, made by a decent American company that believes in what they’re doing, and contains essential ingredients for ‘happy’ weight loss in dogs.

Use the following chart for feeding, but then knock yourself out.

 

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Home for two happy Paints https://johnsonvet.com/home-for-two-happy-paints/ Mon, 02 Sep 2019 20:32:29 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1943 The post Home for two happy Paints appeared first on Johnson Vet Services.

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How To Give A Shot of Insulin To A Dog https://johnsonvet.com/how-to-give-a-shot-of-insulin-to-a-dog/ Thu, 29 Aug 2019 20:24:42 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1940 And without much adieu – the article for reading online or download, PDF format: How To Give A Shot of Insulin To A Dog Giving a shot of insulin

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And without much adieu – the article for reading online or download, PDF format: How To Give A Shot of Insulin To A Dog

Giving a shot of insulin

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Ajax Sitting Pretty https://johnsonvet.com/ajax-sitting-pretty/ Wed, 28 Aug 2019 16:54:28 +0000 https://johnsonvet.com/?p=1933 The post Ajax Sitting Pretty appeared first on Johnson Vet Services.

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