Giving Insulin to Difficult Dogs

Most of these were demonstrated on elderly, sweet dogs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYBzw2mljYc
*abstract: giving the insulin much further back on the body, under the skin on the rump area almost near the tail. I had mentioned that anyplace but the ‘eyeball’ is fine.

“Im so stressed out, I cant even get a muzzle on my dog. This is a nightmare. He will not come near me and I cant go near him. He runs, he’s quick, and snaps. I dont know what to do anymore. It takes hours everyday to get a shot in him. Ive tried sneaking up on him and he just knows. One thing I didnt know, that you could give it in the butt. That might be easier. Thanks for the suggestions. Good video.”

We put a larger than she would normal have cone / trumpet … and make sure she is standing on a sturdy rug whilst we sit on bottom stair …. the cone prevents her nipping us ( never been a biter but she gets stressed and only natural )

“Get an auto injector. We got this one from amazon so that we could give our dog allergy shots at home. Before this thing, it was a challenge but now we use the auto-injector and give him his shot as soon as he starts eating a meal. He barely notices.”

###### https://amzn.to/2TKFdp6

“Also it should be warmed up a little not right out of the refrigerator.”

“My dog was also diagnosed with diabetes, at first he was okay with the shots but after a couple of weeks it became nearly impossible. Our solution was to administer the shot while walking him as he’s going. I know this might seem kind of out there but its the only method that consistently worked for us.”

“Be confident and do the shot quickly while the dog is distracted, if possible.”

“I love him so much, please someone help. Is there something to restrain him? I have a muzzle but that doesnt work. Has anyone had this problem? Its the hardest thing in the world and I don’t know how much longer I can take it. Please help”

###A daily calming medicine like Fluoxetine, alprazolam.

“If a muzzle is not working, you are not using it correctly, hire a professional to help you work through this. Your dog has already associated you with stress and you need to counter condition him.”

=====GOOD ONE=========> “I used to be a vet tech and I can tell you that often the stress about the routine you have for the shot makes everything worse. Instead of all the muzzling and fighting try hiding the shot in your pocket. Act like nothing is going to happen. Sit down on your couch or floor ( or on the bed if your dog is allowed there) ask your dog to come lie next to you. Pet them and both of you relax. Practice learning to inject with only one hand this is vital. With the other hand pet your pooch where you plan on giving the injection this will desensitize the area. (Do this more than just when you plan to give the shot that way its not associated with shots all the time) Do your best not to let him see the syringe (so that anticipated anxiety can’t occur) and with a swiftness give the injection. I found that sometimes less restraint is better than more. If there are some treats allowed – I realize pup is diabetic so this might not be possible – so if he likes ice or a certain toy or toy to chew this may aid in distraction. Good luck.”

#Do not coddle the dog. The key above is the “nonchalance’ and “like nothing’s going to happen”

“To add to this, I work in a kennel and there is one dog who boards quite often who is really nasty about it. I recently discovered that if I feed him and then take him on a walk with the needle hidden in my pocket, I can give it to him while he is distracted with our walk, going to the bathroom or whatever else and give it to him quickly without him even realizing it. He just thinks I’m petting him. You have no idea how awesome I felt finally being able to give this guy a shot by myself and not getting bit. I agree with the practicing. Confidence and quickness is key!”

“Hint, draw up injection in kitchen and palm it to living room. Pet dog with one hand and then put treats on floor. thumb off needle cap (you will have to practice this with spent needle) grasp neck fur and stick in and inject. (should take 2 seconds). Any longer and you have to practice your technique on an orange. Fill used syringe with correct amount of water. Thumb off top, grab orange and inject. Don’t cry or get frustrated this will upset the dog. You practice, practice, practice until you are comfortable with technique.”

“Some people just can’t do it, and that’s not their fault. It’s more kind and humane to let the dog go while it’s part of your family then try and find a family that will take care of it.

“Everyone has their limits, and diabetes isn’t always the easiest condition to deal with.”

“This dog is obviously stressed because it’s owner is also stressed when this happens. I’m sure the owner goes into it knowing full well how next to impossible it’s going to be, and dogs can read your body language, and sense your stress even if you’re trying to hide it. ”

“and just get a lot better at being calm around the dog, hanging out with it pinching and petting so the dog gets used to the sensation, that the dog will warm up and OP will be able to do it swiftly, without the dog taking much notice. Even if the dog never learns to accept getting insulin, then OP just needs to get better at hiding it and doing it really quickly with one hand so the dog doesn’t even know what hit it.”

“My dog hates getting shots in the back of the neck, so we give her insulin in the hind thigh area. She’s pretty food motivated and it’s easy to distract her with treats in one hand while giving the injection with the other (it did take practice – maybe use a Kong with hidden treats to buy you more time).”

“My small dog also has diabetes and he does pretty well with them and I think we’ve had so much success because he now associates the shot with treats. He eats, I make my coffee and do some things around the kitchen, then I get the insulin ready and grab a treat. As soon as he hears me grab the treat from the bag his tail is wagging and he gets so excited, I sit in the floor with him give him the shot real quick and as soon as I pull away I give him the treat. “

For Your Consideration:

Johnson Vet Services 2019